Issues

We focus our expertise on issues related to mood, anxiety, and schizophrenia for individuals above 15 years old, though we are also confident on handling other issues such as sleep difficulties and addiction. In handling the issue, we continuously consult th Cochrane Library to provide you with the best psychological treatment available based on latest evidence

Stress and Burnout

Any change or demand that requires someone to adapt to can induce stress. It is healthy to feel stressed. For example, having to meet a deadline, breaking up with significant others, experiencing illness, or experiencing the death of a family member are all stressful. However, when these things occur on top of one another, someone might experience burnout.  Burnout manifests itself in symptoms such as being constantly exhausted at work, skeptical of any changes, do not have hope, and becoming less effective at work. This is when stress starts to have an impact and should be intervened.

The treatment aims to help clients to manage their stress which might include relaxation techniques, cognitive restructuring to address unhelpful way of thinking, goal-setting, and assertive communication skills. The therapy, on average, lasts for one or two months.

Somatization/Psychosomatic

The treatment aims to help clients to manage their stress which might include relaxation techniques, cognitive restructuring to address unhelpful way of thinking, goal-setting, and assertive communication skills. The therapy, on average, lasts for one or two months.

Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety disorders are a group of conditions that manifests in excessive fear and anxiety that are severe enough to have an impact in personal, family, social, educational, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. For example:

Generalized Anxiety

Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by marked symptoms of anxiety that occurs on most days for at least several months. It manifested by either general vigilance or excessive worry focused on multiple everyday events, usually concerning family, health, finances, and/or school or work. This occurs together with symptoms such as tense muscles, nervousness, difficulty maintaining concentration, irritability, or sleep difficulties.

 

Social Anxiety

Social anxiety disorder is characterized by consistent discomfort in one or more social situations such as social interactions (e.g., having a conversation), being observed (e.g., eating or drinking), or performing in front of others (e.g., giving a speech). These social situations are consistently avoided or else endured with intense discomfort. The symptoms persist for at least several months and are sufficiently severe to result in significant impact in important areas of functioning such as work or relationships.

Panic disorders

Panic disorder is recurrent panic attacks that happen without any singular cause. Panic attacks are discrete episodes of intense fear or discomfort characterized by a rapid and concurrent onset of several symptoms (e.g., increased heart rate, sweating, trembling, shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness or lightheadedness, chills, hot flushes, fear of imminent death). It becomes a disorder when there is a persistent concern about the recurrence of panic attacks and there are behaviors intended to avoid their recurrence that results in significant impairment in important areas of functioning.


Treatment: Principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy will be applied. The behavioral components of the treatment will involve techniques such as graded exposure/desensitization, self-monitoring/diary, and behavioral experiment. The cognitive components of the treatment will involve a range of cognitive restructuring techniques. The therapy, on average, lasts for two or three months.

Depression

Depressive disorders are characterized by depressive mood (e.g., sad, irritable, empty), loss of pleasure and interest, and accompanied by other cognitive and/or behavioral symptoms such as feeling of worthlessness, decreasing level of activities, changing sleep-waking pattern, or losing appetite and weight,  which significantly affects the individual’s ability to function.

Treatment: Principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy will be applied. The cognitive components of the treatment involve a range of cognitive restructuring techniques to address issues such as negative self-evaluation, strict and unrealistic personal standard, and cognitive distortion. The behavioral components of the treatment involve techniques such as behavioral activation, relaxation, and sleep hygiene. The therapy, on average, lasts for one or two months.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

OCD is characterized by the presence of persistent obsessions or compulsions, or most commonly both. Obsessions are repetitive and persistent thoughts, images, or urges that are intrusive, unwanted, and are commonly associated with anxiety. The individual attempts to ignore or suppress obsessions or to neutralize them by performing compulsions, that is repetitive behaviors including repetitive mental acts that the individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession, according to rigid rules, or to achieve a sense of ‘completeness’.

Treatment: Principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy will be applied. The cognitive components of the treatment will involve a range of cognitive restructuring techniques to challenge the distorted belief related to the obsessions. The behavioral components of the treatment will involve techniques, such as relaxation, graded exposure/desensitization to the obsession-triggering stimulus and behavioral experiment (trying to voluntarily prevent performing the compulsive behavior and observe the outcome of not doing the behavior). The therapy, on average, lasts for several months.

Eating Disorder

Eating disorders are characterized with abnormal eating behavior and preoccupation with food as well as prominent body weight and shape concerns that are not explained by another health condition and are not developmentally appropriate or culturally sanctioned. Eating disorders include, but not limited to, Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge eating disorder.

Treatment: Principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy will be applied. The cognitive components of the treatment involve a range of cognitive restructuring techniques to challenge distorted belief about issues related to ED issues such as body image, self-worth, need for control, and food preoccupation. The behavioral components of the treatment involve techniques such as meal-planning/time-tabling and behavioral experiment with food restriction habit. When needed, during the course of therapy we might refer the client to other professionals such as medical doctor or nutritionist. The therapy, on average, lasts for several months.

Psychosis

Psychotic disorders are characterized by significant impairments in reality testing and alterations in behavior manifest in positive symptoms such as persistent delusions (a firm belief about something in contrast to reality), persistent hallucinations (sensory experiences and perception with an absent of external stimuli), disorganized thinking (typically manifest as disorganized speech), grossly disorganized behavior, and negative symptoms such as blunted or flat affect, decrease in motivation and purposeful behavior, loss of interest and pleasure,  and psychomotor disturbances.

Treatment: Special principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis will be applied to address factors that may trigger and/or maintain symptoms of psychosis. The cognitive components of the treatment involve a range of cognitive restructuring techniques to address cognitions that trigger symptoms such as negative self-evaluation, negative other-evaluation and cognitive distortion. The behavioral components of the treatment involve techniques such as behavioral activation, behavioral experiment, and sleep hygiene. In addition, we also apply therapeutic principles from the experimental works of the hearing voices movement. The therapy, on average, lasts for six months.

Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline Personality Disorder is characterized by unstable moods (particularly anger, sadness, anxiety/fear), behaviour and relationships. People with borderline personality disorder consistently felt empty, worthless, and insecure. They often exhibit self-destructive behaviors such as frequent self-harm (e.g. cutting, hitting oneself), suicidal ideation/attempts, or high risk behaviors (e.g. gambling, speeding).

Treatment: Principles of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy will be applied. The therapy involve four cour components: emotion regulation, distress tolerance, mindfulness, and interpersonal skills. The therapy, on average, lasts for a year.